ROK Drop

Avatar of GI KoreaBy on December 12th, 2011 at 8:19 am

Chinese Fishermen Murders Another South Korean Coast Guard Officer

» by in: China

Via a reader tip comes news that the already out of control Chinese fishermen situation has led to yet another murder of a South Korean Coast Guard officer:

One South Korean Coast Guard commando was killed and another was injured in stabbings by Chinese sailors caught for fishing illegally in the Yellow Sea off Incheon, west of Seoul, Monday, the Coast Guard said.

After being stabbed by the Chinese captain, the 41-year-old corporal surnamed Lee was rushed to a hospital in Incheon but died soon after arriving there due to severe organ damage, the Coast Guard said.

Lee had been holding the Chinese captain near the steering wheel after his commando team seized the 66-ton Chinese shipping vessel in the Coast Guard’s raid operation in waters about 85 kilometers off Socheong Island around 7:00 a.m.

The Chinese captain suddenly broke a window pane on the ship and stabbed the corporal several times with a piece of broken glass, according to the Coast Guard.

The other officer, identified only as a 33-year-old Lee, sustained an injury to his stomach and was undergoing treatment at the same Incheon hospital, it noted. [Yonhap]

You can read more at the link but this is absolutely ridiculous and it will be interesting to see what both the South Korean and Chinese response to this will be.  Will South Korea heavily prosecute this guy or give him a slap on the hand in order to not anger China?  Will the Chinese government try to pressure the South Korean government to go light on this guy?  Will the Chinese government finally do something to stop these out of control fishermen?

It will also be interesting to see what the reaction of the South Korean public and media will be?  Will they show as much interest in this murder as the Dongducheon rape case involving a USFK servicemember?  Will the Korean activist groups demand repeated apologies from the President of China like they did of President Bush after the 2002 Armored Vehicle Accident?  If you read the rest of the article you will see that the Chinese ambassador has offered no apologies for the murder unlike USFK leadership that seems to have to immediately apologize for every time a USFK servicemember farts in Itaewon.  Will the Korean media and activist groups demand that the ambassador apologize?  I guess we will see.

You can read more on this issue over at the Marmot’s Hole.

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37
  • John in CA
    11:33 am on December 12th, 2011 1

    It’s not the S Koreans who are protesting agains the rapes/2002 armored vehicle incident. It’s the few agitators who want to politicize such incidents to somehow force USFK to withdraw, thus obeying the command of Kim of N Korea. We should all be clear on that.

    As for S Korea/Japan, well it’s difficult for everyeone to deal with China. US isn’t all that successful in making China behave either…

  • Lemmy
    12:16 pm on December 12th, 2011 2

    You may not be able to deal with china, but you can sure deal with a boat illegally fishing. Its called a torpedo and NK used one nearly getting away with it. I’m sure the South can successfully sink a few illegal fishing boats on night and no one would ever notice them missing. Heck, boilers explode all the time and the ocean is deep and vast.

  • webbing
    12:18 pm on December 12th, 2011 3

    Yeah, I remember those “few” protesters in the street in 2002.

    Koreans have brains, stop making excuses for them. No one can force the individual Korean into the streets to protest, it’s a choice.

    Teach Korean adults for a few years and you’ll come to learn that more than a “few” Koreans hate Americans despite what the usual Koreaphiles say and the excuses they make for Koreans.

  • John in CA
    2:59 pm on December 12th, 2011 4

    #2
    SKorea coast guard has captured and released over 200 or 300 fishing boats from China fishing illegally. Yes, a salvo from a KDX2 would be nice but you know you don’t have to go down to their level.

    #3
    I’m NOT making excuses for them.

  • Denny
    3:15 pm on December 12th, 2011 5

    As few as 12 Chinese hacking groups responsible for most US attacks

    http://www.techspot.com/news/46621-as-few-as-12-chinese-hacking-groups-responsible-for-most-us-attacks.html

    U.S. cyber security analysts and experts say that fewer than 12 different Chinese groups are responsible for most of the China-based cyber attacks that result in critical data being stolen from U.S. companies and government agencies.

    Speaking to The Associated Press, the analysts said the intrusions have resulted in the loss of billions of dollars of intellectual property and other critical data. While stealthy and aggressive in nature, the distinct signatures the hackers leave behind make it possible for U.S. cyber security investigators to more or less accurately identify what teams are responsible.

    According to the report, the U.S. gives unique names or numbers to the attackers, and at times can tell where the hackers are and even who they may be. However, it’s nearly impossible to prosecute hackers in China due to the lack of any form of agreement between the two countries. Even if it was possible to provide definitive proof of where the attacks came from, it’s very unlikely that China would act upon it — not surprisingly given that at least some of these groups are believed to have financial backing from the country’s government or military.

  • kushibo
    3:50 pm on December 12th, 2011 6

    What John in CA said needs to be considered, vis-à-vis any resulting difference between reactions to the 2002 tank incident and this incident. There are so many ways in which they are different, from who got killed, how many got killed, the relationship with the country where the one(s) who did the killing were from, etc.

    Over at The Marmot’s Hole, someone surmised that residual “little brother” relationship with China makes South Korea not respond harshly to bad acts by the Chinese, but I think one differential is that, when the US (or Japan) does something “wrong,” it is an offense by an ally that is supposed to be a first-world country. But when China does it (or North Korea) it’s China being China.

    It also makes a huge difference in that the chinboistas are geared toward anti-government, anti-USFK, anti-Japan, anti-capitalist action, but pro-Pyongyang and neutral on Pyongyang’s key ally, Beijing. The chinboistas, like a cat arching its back, can make themselves look louder and scarier than their actual numbers would seem, but most people who disagree with them go about their lives because they have real-world families and responsibilities.

    Anyway, I would have waited until there was an actual failure to deal with this harshly before knocking anyone for not treating it harshly. It may come, but it may not.

    Hey, Tianjin Tom, is China still Korea’s good buddy? Seoul needs to be careful, because if someone from China embraces you, they might have a huge shard of glass with which to stab you.

  • Tbonetylr
    4:12 pm on December 12th, 2011 7

    # 1,
    Why did you bring up rape and the 2002 armored vehicle incident :?:

    Anyway…
    Here are the “few agitators” tearing up the American flag and protesting…
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/2578655.stm

    And here are some more with signs on their restaurant doors “Seoul restaurants bar US diners…”
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/2523237.stm

  • Orbit
    4:18 pm on December 12th, 2011 8

    Theere are just too many of them.
    No matter how good you are, you can’t beat 10 vs 1.

  • Tom
    4:25 pm on December 12th, 2011 9

    I would answer you Kushibo, but USInKorea has put a muzzle on my internet so that I can’t reply promptly. All my posts are delayed by hours, sometimes by days – making my typing of my opinion, useless because, most people will miss my posts. You will notice I have virtually given up here from posting. :roll:

  • kangaji
    5:15 pm on December 12th, 2011 10

    #7: Yeah, I was trying really hard not to smash that window that month.

  • kangaji
    5:17 pm on December 12th, 2011 11

    #7: They should be out of business by now. It was a restaurant near one of the exits for the KyoboMungo (Gyanghwamun?) subway station and really close to the US embassy and the protest epicenter. I’d like to go back and check it out sometime, but it’s been years since 2002.

  • kushibo
    5:48 pm on December 12th, 2011 12

    Tbonetylr (#7), wasn’t it GI Korea who brought them up?

  • kushibo
    6:56 pm on December 12th, 2011 13

    And here are some more with signs on their restaurant doors “Seoul restaurants bar US diners…”

    Their restaurant doors? Why the plural, when the article only shows one?

    I think the Hongdae signs may be apocryphal. “No GI” signs in Hongdae predated the two girls’ deaths, and it may be one of those things that the reporters get wrong, like in the mid-1990s when it looked like North Korean might attack and the reporters who came around heard the air raid drills on the 15th of that month and assumed (wrongly) that this was not a regular thing but a fearful response by Seoul authorities.

    From the article:A few anti-US signs have also appeared near Seoul’s Hongik University, an entertainment district, but the signs are not widespread.I think this article made it out to be a lot bigger than it was. Zeno is a not-too-far walk from my home, and I went over there a couple days after this appeared in the Western media to look for the sign and possibly do an impromptu interview with the owner, but the sign was gone by then.

    Make no mistake, though, there were a lot of very, very angry people, but that “No Americans” sign gets a lot more play than it warrants, especially given that such sentiments are by no means alien to America itself.

  • charlie marlow
    7:45 pm on December 12th, 2011 14

    I had no idea fishermen were such a violent bunch.
    Or could they be something else? What kind of fisherman would stab 2 military people when under arrest? I wonder if there is something more than fish on these boats.

  • kushibo
    11:18 pm on December 12th, 2011 15

    Lemmy (#2), you’re advocating murdering Chinese people. I’m shocked. Shocked! :twisted:

  • Leon LaPorte
    1:07 am on December 13th, 2011 16

    Truly the deadliest catch.

    But, but, but, where is Tienanmen Tom (and the other ROKhead Chi-Com apologists)? I thought China was Koreas’ bestest buddy in the whole world.

  • kushibo
    1:16 am on December 13th, 2011 17

    Leon LaPorte wrote:

    But, but, but, where is Tienanmen Tom (and the other ROKhead Chi-Com apologists)? I thought China was Koreas’ bestest buddy in the whole world.

    Besides Tianjin Tom, who would the other ROKhead Chi-Com apologists be?

  • Leon LaPorte
    1:22 am on December 13th, 2011 18

    I’m not sayin! :roll:

    Actually, I haven’t seen them around these parts in quite some time. I just didn’t want Te Bie Tom to feel lonely.

  • JoeC
    3:07 am on December 13th, 2011 19

    The Chinese captain suddenly broke a window pane on the ship and stabbed the corporal several times with a piece of broken glass, according to the Coast Guard.

    Something about story seems strange.

    The window panes on maritime vessels should normally have toughened safety glass which shouldn’t break into sharp edged shards large enough to stab someone with.

    But then, the Chinese are known for cutting corners on products and equipment.

    Even then, how did that little guy in the picture do it exactly? Did he smash the window from the inside which would suggest the large pieces fell on the outside. Then, he runs outside, grabs a piece, runs back inside with it to stab two men? :?:

    There must have been an unattached plane glass window pane just happened to have laying around on the side at the time. :idea:

  • kushibo
    4:23 am on December 13th, 2011 20

    JoeC wrote:

    The window panes on maritime vessels should normally have toughened safety glass which shouldn’t break into sharp edged shards large enough to stab someone with.

    Even their boats are cheap Chinese knock-offs of real boats. The walls are probably made with tainted baby formula.

  • The Sanity Inspector
    10:21 am on December 13th, 2011 21

    At some point, it’s time to introduce the pirates to Mr. Minigun.

  • kushibo
    2:12 pm on December 13th, 2011 22

    Tom wrote:

    I would answer you Kushibo, but USInKorea has put a muzzle on my internet so that I can’t reply promptly. All my posts are delayed by hours, sometimes by days – making my typing of my opinion, useless because, most people will miss my posts.

    Fair enough. Except that your response got through just fine.

    Tell you what, go and write your response. Whether you’re one of the millions of Chinese students, hackers, and other operatives utilized by Chinese authorities for Internet propaganda and psyops purposes, or a Korean immigrant to Canada hopelessly out of touch with what’s actually going on in the Korean zeitgeist, or a KoKo who is inexplicably pro-Chinese, I’d love to hear what you have to say about this.

    I may have tainted what you were going to say because of what I just wrote, but I really do want to know if China is still Korea’s good buddy, and if so why (and how)?

    And what I’ll do is this: If you write it and USinKorea does not post it right away, go and post it HERE, in this post that alludes to the murder of the Coast Guardsman (what do we call them?).

    I promise to let it out of the moderation queue right away (all posts are moderated on my blog… you wouldn’t believe the disgusting things ChickenHead, Sonagi, and Glans try to put up there when I’m not paying attention). Heck, if I’m in the mood, I might even turn it into its own post.

    You will notice I have virtually given up here from posting.

    Oh. I thought that was because the impending economic doom in China due to the housing market crisis had forced the PRC authorities to stop subsidizing students it sends abroad in exchange for promoting pro-Beijing propaganda.

  • kushibo
    2:19 pm on December 13th, 2011 23

    The Sanity Inspector wrote:

    At some point, it’s time to introduce the pirates to Mr. Minigun.

    This is how Korean my brain is at times: not knowing what it was actually referring to, I read “Minigun” and thought the last syllable was supposed to be 군 (軍, as in military). At first I imagined this 미니군 was some special small military contingent that would be especially useful in taking out pirates or boats or something.

    Then I thought it might be a play on 미군, US soldiers… wasn’t sure what the 니 part would be.

    Anyway, if this “Mr. Minigun” is a well known character, I propose nicknaming USFK personnel as “Mr. Migun.”

  • John in CA
    3:50 pm on December 13th, 2011 24

    #7
    Because GI Korea brought it up first in his post?

    #14
    The word on the internet is that everyone on the fishing boats are on the hook to loan sharks in China for the boat/fuel etc etc. And whey they are caught by SKorea coast guard, they are fined heavily. The loss of work and the fine effectively put them into additional years of almost slavery like condition, back at the sea. Hence the desperate/violent reaction when S Korea coast guard attempt to catch them.

    In 2008 another S Korea coast guard man was killed in similar incident. But this 2011 incident is the first case where an officer was attacked directly that resulted in death.

  • kushibo
    4:01 pm on December 13th, 2011 25

    John in CA (#24), I think what you’re saying about them being in hock and on the hook to the loan sharks sounds very plausible, though I’d like to see more evidence.

    If that is true, it represents how truly mucked up modern-day China has become as it has twistedly embraced the “it’s glorious to be rich” philosophy at the expense of traditional values.

  • Tom
    4:32 pm on December 13th, 2011 26

    “And what I’ll do is this: If you write it and USinKorea does not post it right away, go and post it HERE” – kushipo

    Well Kushibo, I wrote that more than a day ago. It only took couple of dozen hours. I’m surprised you went back and picked up my post from this thread. I wonder how long this post will take to go out of moderation. :roll:

    Which means, this is all getting to be a one big hassel for me and a waste of time. Too bad my free opinions are not appreciated. :sad:

  • Glans
    7:49 pm on December 13th, 2011 27

    I like Tom, I understand that he looks at events from a different point of view, and I look forward to his comment on this incident.

  • Glans
    3:29 am on December 14th, 2011 28

    The murder weapon seems to have been a knife, not broken glass. Robert Koehler has an update with informative links.

  • ChickenHead
    1:23 pm on December 14th, 2011 29

    You win, Glans.

    It was the Captain with the Knife in the Wheelhouse.

    We must be playing the Asian Edition of…

    …Crew.

  • JoeC
    1:29 pm on December 14th, 2011 30

    #28

    That answers some of my questions.

    The reason I could never be a journalist is because I would always be questioning explanations that don’t pass the common sense test.

  • kushibo
    1:30 pm on December 14th, 2011 31

    Tom wrote:

    “And what I’ll do is this: If you write it and USinKorea does not post it right away, go and post it HERE” – kushipo

    Well Kushibo, I wrote that more than a day ago. It only took couple of dozen hours. I’m surprised you went back and picked up my post from this thread. I wonder how long this post will take to go out of moderation. :roll:

    Which means, this is all getting to be a one big hassel for me and a waste of time. Too bad my free opinions are not appreciated. :sad:

    Stop it, you’re making me cry.

    Um, no, Tom. You really don’t have an excuse for not enlightening us by answering the question.

    Like I said, it does not matter if you do not get it put up right away here, because you can post it in the link I’d provided, immediately after you post it here and it goes in the moderation queue.

    In fact, since I’m not being moderated, I’ll take your post to my blog, and I will post it myself directly here, in a giant blockquote.

    How’s that? I know you can read my posts instantaneously, so go ahead, write your answer, and post it here and over there, and then we can talk about it. No excuses, just action.

  • Tom
    4:44 pm on December 14th, 2011 32

    Kushibo is desperate for my opinion. :lol:

    Be a good boy and I may just give you one as a reward. :lol:

  • kushibo
    4:51 pm on December 14th, 2011 33

    Tom, it’s pretty clear at this point that you’re not willing to give one. The “my posts are in moderation” excuse is a load of hooey at this point, since you’ve replied two or three times now that your comments are moderated, yet they make it through.

    And in good time, too. On the other thread, you replied to JH just sixteen minutes after he posted a comment.

    My informed supposition is that you are afraid it will reveal something about yourself, so you’re ducking the issue.

    Clearly you have an opinion, you don’t need to mull it over. Unless you’re waiting for approval from someone. :roll:

    But my guarantee that anything you write on the subject will be posted here and/or at Monster Island still stands.

  • Tom
    4:57 pm on December 14th, 2011 34

    And this post should appear about 5 minutes after yours.

    :lol:

  • kushibo
    5:01 pm on December 14th, 2011 35

    And this post should appear about 5 minutes after yours.

    So the time thing is a moot point.

    Go ahead, tell us if, despite incidents like this one, China is still Korea’s good buddy, and if so why (and how)?

  • Tom
    5:08 pm on December 14th, 2011 36

    Why do you hate the Chinese so much? What have they done to you? Why are you so anti-China? Why do you guys hate China so much? Is it because you guys can’t take the fact that the US is falling behind China economically more and more? :roll:

  • kushibo
    5:39 pm on December 14th, 2011 37

    Tom, that is not answering the question. In fact, it’s an effort you’re making to avoid answering it.

    But to answer anyway, I don’t hate Chinese people at all. Here in Hawaii I have quite a few Chinese friends (some of whom ask me why Koreans try to take credit for so many Chinese things, so I have to set them straight).

    Just as with any nationality, there are some Chinese people I find annoying, but the vast majority are all right people. (And there are many who, in lockstep with commands of the local consulate, would protest in favor of or against whatever Beijing decided, like Burmese students or Tibetans here in Honolulu).

    Now, what I have a great amount of distrust toward, which sometimes moves toward animosity, are the Chinese authorities, who can be quite thuggish, especially toward South Korea.

    They try to placate the masses’ potential anger toward government policy and its grossly unfair crony capitalism by trying to whip up anti-Korean, anti-Japanese, anti-American, anti-Taiwanese, and anti-European sentiment. Korea is a perfect foil for them to whip up because it is perceived as weaker and, unlike the Taiwanese, few Koreans can read Chinese to see what all they’re writing. At the same time, they sponsor and prop up a regime that has murderous intentions on South Korea.

    All this is very dangerous for South Korea. Very dangerous. All the more so that China thinks it is the natural ruler of the region.

    That you would think that South Korea should cut loose from the alliance that has kept it secure for the past six decades and rush into an alliance with an arrogant, murderous regime that is utterly incapable of seeing South Korea as a country worthy of same-level respect, not to mention whose failure to maintain its own defense meant that Korea was the site or reward of FOUR WARS during the previous six decades, is abominable.

    But that’s the position you’ve taken, and I’d like to see how you can defend it in light of this type of incident, which is not a one-off but a pattern.

 

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