ROK Drop

Avatar of GI KoreaBy on June 11th, 2012 at 5:59 pm

North Korean Defectors A Hit On Popular South Korean TV Show

The TV show producers are obviously using the good looks of these women to attract viewers, but this is actually a pretty good way to raise awareness of the North Korean refugee issue in South Korea:

Lee Seo-youn rehearses a dance routine she’ll perform in a couple of hours in a TV studio. Slender, graceful and dressed in a form-fitting hot pink maxi-skirt, Lee looks like a South Korean celebrity.

Appearances can be deceiving.

As a regular panelist on South Korean television’s “Eje Mannareo Gapnida,” which airs on cable’s Channel A, Lee is one of a dozen or so female North Korean defectors featured on the program.

Part talk show and part talent show, the title translates as “Now On My Way to Meet You,” a name that conveys the program’s goal of raising awareness between average North and South Koreans.

It has been well received by the South Korean public for its unique approach to the prickly North Korea issue since it debuted in December, with mostly positive reviews and a growing viewership.  [LA Times]

You can read more at the link.

Tags: , ,
- 1,742 views
82
  • guitard
    4:31 pm on June 11th, 2012 1

    Is it just a coincidence that 3/4 of the North Koreans allowed into South Korea in recent years are female? Or is the South Korean gov’t killing two birds with one stone by allowing in more females – and by doing so – helping out a thousand South Korean males every year find a Korean wife?

  • 2 ID Doc
    4:53 pm on June 11th, 2012 2

    I haven’t been in-country in over 2 decades, but I was under the impression that most North Koreans who defect were having trouble assimilating into South Korean society because of the repression they faced in the North and the relatively enormous freedom of the South, or was it the usual garbage spewed by the US mainstream media?

  • guitard
    5:04 pm on June 11th, 2012 3

    The biggest problem they face is culture shock – going from a society where productivity meant little to one where being productive is how you survive – this is especially true for the male defectors. Another big problem is the language barrier – South Koreans use thousands of words that the North Koreans have never heard – especially young South Koreans.

  • Glans
    5:09 pm on June 11th, 2012 4

    Language differences are mentioned in the La Times story. How bad is it? Do the defectors just have to learn a few thousand new words, or are pronunciation and grammar difficult, too?

  • guitard
    5:34 pm on June 11th, 2012 5

    It’s mostly just learning all the new words. But there is another side to it. Young defectors who don’t know the words feel ostracized and think that they’ll never fit in. It makes them reclusive.

  • Tom
    6:42 pm on June 11th, 2012 6

    #1, another useless unsubstantiated charge taking a smart a$$ potshot, what do I expect with the mind of an ESL huckster neanderthal? ;-)

    Guitard, you haven’t even watched this show, I have. You have no ideal what you’re talking about. Now go back to watching NFL football.

  • guitard
    7:01 pm on June 11th, 2012 7

    Tom ~ the Korean wannabe from Canadian ~ I live in Korea and through my church do a lot of outreach with defectors.

    Unlike you – my connection to Korea isn’t exclusively through an internet link. I actually live here and deal with much of this stuff in my daily life.

  • Tom
    8:34 pm on June 11th, 2012 8

    So is that right Guitard? Is that why you come up with such ridiculous claim as post number 1? Yes I believe you. :lol:

    By the way you don’t sound like a church goer. What happened to love thy enemy, turn the other cheek? Instead all I see from you are sniping at Koreans and nasty putdown posts. :lol:

  • Teadrinker
    9:45 pm on June 11th, 2012 9

    “Another big problem is the language barrier – South Koreans use thousands of words that the North Koreans have never heard – especially young South Koreans.”

    Isn’t that a bit overstated, though? It seems to me like something that someone who doesn’t have a clue that Korean isn’t the only language that has dialects would say.

  • Tom
    10:04 pm on June 11th, 2012 10

    #9, Spoken like somebody who truly don’t have a clue. It’s not the dialect or the accent you ijiot.

  • Seoul Guy
    11:12 pm on June 11th, 2012 11

    Many South Koreans look down upon NK defectors. Funny thing about my countrymen: they are so much similar to their past tormentor – Japanese. ROKs seem to feel small in front of White people but Koreans must fee big in front of “others” – including Koreans from China and NK. Kids from Korean-Chinese and NK families are often bullied and ridiculed by their South Korean classmates. They all are Koreans but not all SKs do not seem to feel that way. It’s something all Koreans must reflect on and amend on to prepare for the eventual unification of the North and South Korea. #5, Guitard is correct in that sense. I don’t know about 3/4 of NK defectors being females but many are coming in-country. We should prepare for more coming to South Korea.

  • guitard
    11:24 pm on June 11th, 2012 12

    guitard wrote:

    “Another big problem is the language barrier – South Koreans use thousands of words that the North Koreans have never heard – especially young South Koreans.”

    Teadrinker wrote:

    Isn’t that a bit overstated, though? It seems to me like something that someone who doesn’t have a clue that Korean isn’t the only language that has dialects would say.

    Dialects? I never said a word about dialects. And my statement never implied that dialects have anything whatsoever to do with the point that I expressed.

    Either you know nothing about the Korean language – or your English reading comprehension is really poor.

    Which is it?

  • guitard
    11:27 pm on June 11th, 2012 13

    A random sampling of articles discussing – among other things – the language barrier:

    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/10/05/2010100501003.html

    More than a quarter of North Korean defectors who entered 10 universities in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province through the special admission process quit their studies due to difficulties with their academic work caused by the language barrier, which includes English expressions and unfamiliar words.

    http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/article/2011/05/20110519091211enaj0.364361.html

    According to a survey, 92 percent of the North Korea defectors experience a language barrier on their job training. With the increasing number of North Korean defectors, there is an urgent need for special programs that train specialized job-trainers for defectors.

  • Seoul Guy
    11:35 pm on June 11th, 2012 14

    #13, I do not disagree with Guitard. There is difference in expression. There is real language barrier there. Recent defectors should go through something like ESL. Important point is that all “recent” defectors need such program. Once they settle down and start watching SK TV programs, they get the hang of it pretty quickly. It is not like they are learning English language.

  • Seoul Guy
    11:36 pm on June 11th, 2012 15

    Main problem for NKs and Korean-Chinese are the accents. South Koreans are so good at discerning “them” from “us”. We need to move away from such “grouping” of people.

  • Seoul Guy
    11:45 pm on June 11th, 2012 16

    Kids in South Korea could get real brutual at their weaker peers. It applies to all kids in South Korea.

  • Glans
    12:01 am on June 12th, 2012 17

    Do educated, influential North Koreans sound odd? I don’t mean their ideology, but does the way they speak the language sound odd to South Koreans?

  • Seoul Guy
    12:18 am on June 12th, 2012 18

    #17, yes, in general, South Koreans can immediately discern a Korean-Chinese or NK defector’s accent. They sound very irregular to accents already used throught South Korea – especially Seoul. The so called educated North Koreans are exception to aforementioned.

    An educated New Yorker would sound like New Yorker whether he’d graduated from Columbia or not. It is hard to treat one’s accent.

  • Seoul Guy
    12:20 am on June 12th, 2012 19

    I meant the so called educated North Koreans are not exception to aforementioned.

  • Fanwarrior
    1:22 am on June 12th, 2012 20

    The biggest issue is the Konglish. Most of the rest of the Korean vocabulary and grammar is normal. There is so much konglish in young people’s lives these days that it’s quite a task for north koreans to learn it all. I would think academically they might do better since there might not be as much Konglish, but I guess not.

    There are a few Korean words that have slightly different meanings and things like that, but Konglish is the killer, maybe some hanja as well. I think the north has made greater efforts to remove hanja.

  • Seoul Guy
    1:27 am on June 12th, 2012 21

    #20, yes, that too. Chinese characters are not used extensively but many of the “official” words used daily by businessmen and academics are all based on the Chinese characters. Konglish & Internet speak may be hard to follow.

  • guitard
    1:40 am on June 12th, 2012 22

    The (mostly) English loan words are the reason for the language barrier to which I was referring.

  • Seoul Guy
    2:00 am on June 12th, 2012 23

    #22, noted. txs.

  • MTB Rider
    2:15 am on June 12th, 2012 24

    Tom Said: #1, another useless unsubstantiated charge taking a smart a$$ potshot, what do I expect with the mind of an ESL huckster neanderthal?

    You know, if you’re posting, there is this handy tool you can use to look things up with called Google? Yeah, Google (actually Wikipedia) shows that 60-70% of the North Koreans fleeing The Worker’s Paradise are women, and that of those 70-80% are victims of human trafficking. Which means even YOU have a chance to get a date! :razz:

    As for the rest, the North Korean accent is different, and their evolution of language has been very different from South Korea over the past 50 years. And those 50 years included a huge leap forward in technology, which brought many words that the rest of the world learned while North Korea continues to eulogize the Kim family. There is more, but other people have posted above me, so no need to repeat their statements.

    Oh, and you never explained how Government Sponsored Piracy is better than Government Sponsored Prostitution. Normal, non-sociopathic humans know BOTH are wrong, but you’ve come out in FAVOR of the DPRK piracy against Chinese fishermen in International Waters, but AGAINST the Japanese use of “Comfort” women during WWII. Personally I find BOTH practices wrong, and stated so in the other thread. Which you, of course, ran away from as quickly as your little Canadian legs would carry you. :lol:

  • Teadrinker
    4:00 am on June 12th, 2012 25

    #10,

    Do you even know what a dialect is?

    #24,

    “As for the rest, the North Korean accent is different, and their evolution of language has been very different from South Korea over the past 50 years.”

    Gee, makes me wonder how I manage to communicate with Belgians, Frenchmen, Senegalese, and other francophones perfectly well despite the fact that my ancestors immigrated to Canada four centuries ago.

  • MTB Rider
    4:28 am on June 12th, 2012 26

    @ Teadrinker:
    The accent is different, not the language. But having a “primitive” accent can bias people against those with the accents. Look at anybody putting down “Southerners” for being dumb, inbred rednecks without bothering to find out what they might actually know, individually or as a group.

    Happens all the time. It’s not fair, it’s not right, but it happens. Look at Cajuns. Of French descent, living in the bayous of Louisiana. Have you ever mocked them for being simple? Or what about “Pure” French, mocking their “Canadian Cousins?” Don’t say it doesn’t happen, or I’ll call you a liar right in front of everybody.

    As for the evolution of North and South Korean languages, look at each separately. North Korean developed along autocratic lines, with emphasis on social standing. South Korea went more technological route, with many borrowed words from English, French, German and others. It takes a while to learn all the terms. South Korean have all their lives to learn it, North Korean get a three month course, and a hearty “Good Luck Out There” upon graduation.

  • Tom
    4:29 am on June 12th, 2012 27

    “Google (actually Wikipedia) shows that 60-70% of the North Koreans fleeing The Worker’s Paradise are women, and that of those 70-80% are victims of human trafficking. Which means even YOU have a chance to get a date! ”

    I wasn’t referring to that ijiot. I do know more women are defectors. I’m referring to the neanderthal’s unsubstantiated charge that only the women are allowed in for specific purpose of marrying them off. Maybe you should have told Guitard instead to look up the google before making false claims?

    As for SeoulGuy, it proves you ain’t Korean. To be that clueless… how can you be Korean? Even the resident Neanderthal gets it right. Fanwarrior must be Korean, he got it right also. It ain’t the accent that’s the problem, and it doesn’t take very long for North Koreans to lose it. It’s the vocabulary of loan words from English, in Korean, that’s the biggest problem.

  • Jinro Dukkohbi
    5:33 am on June 12th, 2012 28

    Wow – I found a post by Tom (#27) that I agree with completely~~ ;-)

  • guitard
    6:10 am on June 12th, 2012 29

    Tom wrote:

    . . . unsubstantiated charge . . . false claims . . .

    It obviously went right over your head – but I simply asked a question.

    Asking a question and making an unsubstantiated charge or false claim are two entirely different things.

    And it’s a good thing that you are in Canada, because you’d surely be one of those who couldn’t find a woman in Korea willing to marry you . . . and the only Korean woman you’d ever know is Miss O Reun-Son. AKA 미스 오른손.

  • Seoul Guy
    6:43 am on June 12th, 2012 30

    :lol: That was good one #29. Anyway, then prove that you are a Korean…Tomette… What makes you so qualified to write such a vehemently anti-western yet not so correct words on korea entirely? And why do you think I am not who I am: a full blooded-Korean-babes-loving man that I am. ;-)

  • Seoul Guy
    6:49 am on June 12th, 2012 31

    A full-blooded- Korean-babes-luving Korean man that I really am … :cool:

  • Teadrinker
    9:33 am on June 12th, 2012 32

    #26,
    “The accent is different, not the language.”

    Shows how little you know about French…and linguistics for that matter.

    You’re American, right? Tell me, how’s your South African and Australian English slang?

    Yes, language is a product of its environment. It’s shaped by the needs of its speakers. South Africans have some very different communicative needs than Texans or New Yorkers. Heck, Texans and New Yorkers have some very distinct needs from one another…And yet, they are all able to communicate in a meaningful manner.

    As I was saying, it’s exaggerated. Question is, why is it so? Prejudice? That’s at least part of the reason.

  • Glans
    1:41 pm on June 12th, 2012 33

    I’m getting the impression that the barrier isn’t so much language as attitudes, both among defectors and among South Koreans. Maybe Eje Mannareo Gapnida will help. By the way, what does “Eje Mannareo Gapnida” mean? Google Translate didn’t help me.

  • Tom
    1:46 pm on June 12th, 2012 34

    “– but I simply asked a question.”

    ..b..bb…bbb….but… butt…butt… then stop asking dumb questions, ijiot!

    “Oh, and you never explained how Government Sponsored Piracy is better than Government Sponsored Prostitution.”

    I have no ideal what you are blaring on about, MTB Rider.. :lol:

    And to you Seoul Guy, you ain’t Korean cause you don’t know jack $hit about anything to do with Korea, you’re just repeating what these neanderthals keep saying. Laughable. :lol:

  • Tom
    1:50 pm on June 12th, 2012 35

    #33 “Now I’m going(leaving) to meet (him/her/whoever).

    Does that answer your question? :lol: Glad to be of help to you. :lol:

  • Glans
    2:32 pm on June 12th, 2012 36

    Thanks Tom, that’s not too different from what the story says, “Now On My Way to Meet You,” so I guess La Times is right. What does it look like in Hangul?

  • Tom
    3:07 pm on June 12th, 2012 37

    이제 만나러갑니다.

    Yangkee Doodle. Yangkee go home. :grin:

  • MTB Rider
    5:18 pm on June 12th, 2012 38

    Really, Tom? You’re going with the “I have no clear memory of that conversation” gambit on the Internet? Wow, you’re even more pathetic than I thought!

    To refresh your soggy memory, the DPRK Navy took over three Chinese fishing boats in Chinese waters, and held them for ransom. Your owners told you to blame the Chinese gor entering North Korean waters, and like the obedient lap dog you are, you promptly ( that is, four days later) made the statement that the Chinese fishermen got what they deserved. I guess ghe Comittee must have decided it was safer to blsme the victims than deal with either a North Korean provocation, or that a North Korean military unit may have gone rogue.

    Did that refresh your memory, or are you the new “Tom,” assigned to replace the “Toms” that came before you? :lol:

  • Teadrinker
    5:22 pm on June 12th, 2012 39

    “Look at Cajuns. Of French descent, living in the bayous of Louisiana. Have you ever mocked them for being simple? Or what about “Pure” French, mocking their “Canadian Cousins?” Don’t say it doesn’t happen, or I’ll call you a liar right in front of everybody.”

    Shows how little you know about Cajuns (Acadians) and other francophones.

  • Glans
    5:22 pm on June 12th, 2012 40

    Google Translate says:
    이제 만나러갑니다 = Now you will see

    I’m at home, Tom. How about you?

  • Tom
    5:36 pm on June 12th, 2012 41

    If that’s the case Glans, “Death to America!” That only proves the bad quality American translator. :lol:

    MTB Rider I do not know what you are ranting about. I’ve not said such a thing, you must be mistaking me with somebody else. :lol:

  • Seoul Guy
    5:48 pm on June 12th, 2012 42

    :cool: Heck Tom, have you ever seen a real naked woman in your life? Your words sound like those of sexually frustrated monkey. Have you had any “cave” expeditions? Do you know what that means in Korean translation? It’s a jargon us Korean guys use amongst ourselves. Most Korean guys aren’t like you who seems to be sexually very frustrated. Korean guys don’t care if hot looking, hot bodied Korean babes only look to get wined and dined and be given expensive presents: 된장녀 or doenjang girls? (Korean bean paste girls: it is a new jargon for women who does nothing but chase after expensive clothes and jewelry. They tend to look at men as source of material goods only) AS LONG AS we get what we want. :lol:

    Tom ! a word of advise to you: go get a life. Go to Toronto, Vancouver or Somewhere there’s a whore…. and get laid. for your own good. I’m gettin’ mine and girls here in Seoul are absolutely fine!! They’re not buxomy but they sure have fine pair of legs and a$$es.

    You might wanna stay in Canada ’cause women here don’t go for a nerd like ya. They like real men.

  • Teadrinker
    6:06 pm on June 12th, 2012 43

    #27,

    You’re projecting, by the way. Cajuns being slow and Frenchmen being arrogant, those are stereotypes created by anglophone Americans in order to marginalize the Franco-American community.

  • guitard
    6:10 pm on June 12th, 2012 44

    탐은 죽을때까지 . . . 미스 오만 알 겁니다 . . . to bad for him . . .

  • Joshi Joe
    6:11 pm on June 12th, 2012 45

    I don’t really know much about the NK Defector issue in South Korea. Looking in, I can see why some have that perception that NK Defectors carry a pariah-like, second-class citizenry status.

    Of course, you never know who these defectors really are or if they really have “defected”, but I’m sure we can expect some from the NK defector communities to really make some significant contributions.

  • guitard
    6:15 pm on June 12th, 2012 46

    Teadrinker wrote:

    Frenchmen being arrogant . . . those are stereotypes created by anglophone Americans . . .

    That’s funny . . . every nationality around the world thinks the French are arrogant . . . but you say it’s only the Americans? Or is it because the rest of the world is just following the Americans?

  • Seoul Guy
    6:17 pm on June 12th, 2012 47

    #43, interesting observation, but the stereotype stuck with me after I’ve been to Paris. People there were so unfriendly. They all seemed arrogant even though they lived off on visiting foreign tourists. It may have been my race: a Korean – that prompted their reaction to me.

    But, Food was good. And the ladies were very feminine. Some Parisienne were similar to hot girls in Seoul. There weren’t as many big bottomed girls in Paris as there were London.

    London gals were big. Big a$$es, tall, big feet. end of story. (North American girls are bigger: probably due to intermixing of nationalities amongst various European nationalities that have immigrated to the U.S. and Canada)

    I luv the K-girls.

  • guitard
    6:20 pm on June 12th, 2012 48

    Seoul Guy wrote:

    North American girls are bigger: probably due to intermixing of nationalities amongst various European nationalities that have immigrated to the U.S. and Canada)

    I luv the K-girls.

    둘다 좋아해도 되는데 . . .

  • Seoul Guy
    7:12 pm on June 12th, 2012 49

    They’re too big for K guys. :mrgreen: we’d would get squashed if girls are on top.

  • kushibo
    7:44 pm on June 12th, 2012 50

    Guitard (#1), I don’t care to swim through forty-nine prior comments, so I’ll just answer here that I’ve read in a number of places (though I’m having trouble finding this online) that among actual defectors (not just those who make it to embassies and consulates and gain entry to the South) women have come to significantly outnumber men.

  • Glans
    8:16 pm on June 12th, 2012 51

    Big feet make a girl stable.

  • Glans
    9:08 pm on June 12th, 2012 52

    Are Korean Embassy employees in Bangkok nice to North Korean defectors? rjKohler raises doubts.

  • Seoul Guy
    10:47 pm on June 12th, 2012 53

    May be. Korean embassy folks are notorious for their arrogant a-hole attitudes.
    All Korean government a-holes are like that. Korea’s competitiveness has nothing to do with government civil service or diplomatic corp s-holes.

    All they want from you is either money or a favor of some kind or both !

  • Teadrinker
    11:01 pm on June 12th, 2012 54

    #46,

    Right, because when an American believes something, the whole world does too.
    :roll:

  • Seoul Guy
    11:17 pm on June 12th, 2012 55

    Frenchmen and women I’d met were rude, so, I prefer not to meet another one of those or associate with one. Unless I meet a fine lookin’ French women who is actually nice, I wouldn’t change my attitude with the French in general. ;-)

  • kushibo
    11:22 pm on June 12th, 2012 56

    SG, on my one trip to France, in 2007, I did not meet one rude Frenchperson. Most were very friendly and quite helpful. Lots of smiles and happiness.

  • Teadrinker
    11:50 pm on June 12th, 2012 57

    “#43, interesting observation, but the stereotype stuck with me after I’ve been to Paris. People there were so unfriendly. They all seemed arrogant even though they lived off on visiting foreign tourists. It may have been my race: a Korean – that prompted their reaction to me.”

    Cultural and linguistic misunderstanding, I would imagine. They are actually some of the friendliest and most helpful people in Europe. They also have a great sense of humour.

    Also, they don’t really depend on tourism. You only think they do because you went there as a tourist. Remember, Paris is not only the capital city of a very wealthy nation, it’s also one of the economic centres of the world.

    I gotta say, though, that Paris can be a rough town. There are neighbourhoods where you definitely shouldn’t go unless you’re a local. And so, Parisians can show a certain attitude not unlike what you’ll find in New York (which, ironically, Americans idolize).

  • Teadrinker
    11:55 pm on June 12th, 2012 58

    #56,

    Yes, very nice people. They aren’t as quick to start a conversation with strangers as we French-Canadians are, but once you get them talking they are quite nice. Last time I went to France, I had long conversations with the people sitting next to me on the train, first a man and his mother, and then a French soldier who had been on several UN missions. When I got to my destination, my brother’s co-worker was there to pick me up. He had driven two hours to get to the station.

  • Teadrinker
    11:59 pm on June 12th, 2012 59

    …Oh, and one of my friends, a Frenchman, just left Korea after having lived here for several years. Great personality with an irreverent sense of humour. Some of his closest friends here were American, by the way.

  • guitard
    12:04 am on June 13th, 2012 60

    Teadrinker wrote:

    Parisians can show a certain attitude not unlike what you’ll find in New York (which, ironically, Americans idolize).

    Holy sh!t!!! Are you phucking kidding me??!!

    New candidate for the stupidest and most ill-informed post of the year!!

  • Glans
    12:20 am on June 13th, 2012 61

    guitard, I gotta agree. I laughed out loud when my friend the Teadrinker said we idolize New York.

  • Seoul Guy
    12:22 am on June 13th, 2012 62

    #60, why is that? nothing wrong with the post. New Yorkers are down right anals. No doubt about it. The whole city wreathes in urinal odor. :cool:

  • guitard
    12:31 am on June 13th, 2012 63

    Seoulguy wrote:

    #60, why is that? nothing wrong with the post. New Yorkers are down right anals. No doubt about it. The whole city wreathes in urinal odor.

    You’re absolutely right – they are downright a-holes (anals). In spite of that, Teardrinker thinks Americans idolize New Yorkers for the attitude they show.

    To suggest that the average American idolize New Yorkers for their attitude is like saying your average Seoulite idolizes a 호남인 for his cultural grace.

  • Teadrinker
    1:08 am on June 13th, 2012 64

    #60,

    Robert De Niro would be as successful if he spoke with a waspy accent.

  • Teadrinker
    1:09 am on June 13th, 2012 65

    #61,

    Not as loudly as I’m laughing at you.

  • Teadrinker
    1:17 am on June 13th, 2012 66

    …It’s not New York that you idolize but the stereotypical attitude. Disagree? Explain why advertisers, movie makers, and TV show producers often use a Brooklyn accent in their products.

  • Teadrinker
    1:17 am on June 13th, 2012 67

    Correction: productions.

  • guitard
    1:49 am on June 13th, 2012 68

    Teadrinker wrote:

    …It’s not New York that you idolize but the stereotypical attitude. Disagree? Explain why advertisers, movie makers, and TV show producers often use a Brooklyn accent in their products.

    You are so phucking clueless . . . at first I thought it was just funny . . . but now it’s reached a point of just being sad.

    I’d say get a clue . . . but quite obviously . . . this stuff is just simply beyond your grasp. No matter how well it’s explained or demonstrated for you . . . you don’t get it . . . and you never will get it.

  • Seoul Guy
    1:56 am on June 13th, 2012 69

    Seoul is the standard for the ROK. City of Seoul is dynamic, global, glitzy, rich, and vibrant, but it is not the way it used to be. It lacks humanism. The old virtues of South Koreans: family, tradition, comraderie, sacrifice, and ever lasting friedship. All values we cherished are overtaken by greed for money.

    Money rules. Anyone lacking it becomes eliminated from the rat race.

    The winner takes it all. Loser packs up and go back to country hamlets.

  • Teadrinker
    2:01 am on June 13th, 2012 70

    #68 Thanks for making my point for me. The stereotype is used because some American men identify with the characters because they like to think of themselves as opinionated and irreverant wiseguys.

  • guitard
    2:05 am on June 13th, 2012 71

    Seoul Guy wrote:

    New Yorkers are down right anals. No doubt about it. The whole city wreathes in urinal odor.

    이렇게 쓰면은 말이 안됩니다.

    “anals” 말고 형용사로 (anal) 적어야합니다. 그래서 New Yorkers are downright anal 라고 하면 되겠습니다.

    그리고 “wreathes” 말고 “reeks” 라고 해야지요.

    “The whole city reeks in urinal odor” 이라고 하면 되지만 말이 좀 이상해요. “The whole city reeks of urine” 이라고 하면 보다 자연스러운 느낌이 됩니다.

  • Glans
    2:20 am on June 13th, 2012 72

    This thread is starting to wreathe in urinal odor. I only hope the TV show in GI Korea’s opening post brings the Glans Plan closer to reality.

  • Guitard
    2:27 am on June 13th, 2012 73

    Starting to wreath . . . ? It’s been wreathing since the git go!

  • Seoul Guy
    2:28 am on June 13th, 2012 74

    :lol: Good. Finally, a poster accepts me as a Korean.

    Thank you for the lesson on American Grammar. I didn’t think I needed to check on my grammar mistakes, but since you have volunteered, I look forward to your corrections.

  • Teadrinker
    2:39 am on June 13th, 2012 75

    #73,

    Yes, at #1.

  • Glans
    3:06 am on June 13th, 2012 76

    Seoul Guy, you’re doing fine. I always understand what you mean. You’re so far ahead of me – I don’t know one word of Korean, I don’t know one Hangul character, but you communicate in English, so you can be proud of your achievement.

  • guitard
    4:03 am on June 13th, 2012 77

    That’s the reason why I took the time to correct his mistakes – because Seoul Guy is right on the cusp of speaking English like an American.

    I might even give him free admission to my upcoming “2주내에 양놈처럼 영어로 탈크시잇 합시다” course. :mrgreen:

  • Seoul Guy
    5:05 am on June 13th, 2012 78

    ;-) put me on your list.

  • Tom
    6:40 am on June 13th, 2012 79

    If Seoul Guy is really Korean, then my name really is Chinese Agitprop. :lol:

    Seoul Guy, you’re no Korean, stop pretending. A Korean who thinks like a white guy? Right.

  • guitard
    7:23 am on June 13th, 2012 80

    Tom: the jealousy in your post is almost palpable.

    It’s probably not your fault that you ended up in Canada . . . and unlike Seoul Guy . . . will never be a real Korean. Yep . . . you’re just a wannabe Korean in the Great White North who will never fit in . . . in either world.

    That’s just the hand you were dealt. Deal with it.

  • Teadrinker
    7:44 am on June 13th, 2012 81

    #79,

    Imagine if you could have communicated that in Korean, you might have been almost convincing. :lol:

  • Seoul Guy
    3:11 pm on June 13th, 2012 82

    Tom. You must be in North American time zone. Keep up the work. You sound really stupid but your comments add to a flavor here.

 

RSS feed for comments on this post | TrackBack URI

By submitting a comment here you grant this site a perpetual license to reproduce your words and name/web site in attribution.

Bad Behavior has blocked 28993 access attempts in the last 7 days.