ROK Drop

Avatar of GI KoreaBy on October 23rd, 2012 at 6:41 pm

Korean Shop Owners Arrested for Selling Sensitive US Military Items

» by in: USFK

I am actually more concerned about tracking down the soldiers that would have to be stealing and then selling sensitive military items like NVG’s down in the ville than the shop owners who are selling them:

Six South Koreans have been booked on suspicion of illegally selling U.S. military equipment, including body armor, helmets and night-vision goggles, police said.

A Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency official said the suspects — who were only identified as middle-aged men — sold the equipment, which they bought from U.S. soldiers, at their shops in Seoul, Dongducheon and Bupyeong.

Police estimated $18,000 worth of equipment was put up for sale, including bayonets and sniper sights. Some of the gear found its way onto Internet sales sites, police said.  [Stars & Stripes]

For those not in the military, the loss of a sensitive item is a very big deal within a unit with regular inventories of this gear conducted by unit armorers and leadership.  I have seen more than one person be relieved of their position due to the loss of a sensitive item.  So I am confident the USFK leadership has opened a thorough investigation into this if US personnel in fact are stealing and selling sensitive military items in the ville.

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  • Setnaffa
    5:01 pm on October 23rd, 2012 1

    Serial numbers?

  • Teadrinker
    5:09 pm on October 23rd, 2012 2

    In my experience, there was always some assholes looking to swipe your gear to sell to army surplus stores. I’m talking about non-sensitive gear (boots, parkas, etc)….but night vision goggles, sniper scopes, body armor…that really makes the USFK look bad.

  • guitard
    5:18 pm on October 23rd, 2012 3

    GI Korea wrote:

    I am actually more concerned about tracking down the soldiers that would have to be stealing and then selling sensitive military items . . .

    Don’t forget . . . a lot of this stuff could have been stolen by someone who isn’t a soldier. Surely you know all about slicky boy, right? Not to mention the very good possibility of thefts occurring while these items are being transported into the country . . . while they’re being transported to depot level maintenance . . . etc.

    The Koreans selling it now who are saying they got it from soldiers could very well be covering up for someone who isn’t a soldier. Because it sounds much more benign to say I bought it from a US soldier – as opposed to saying I bought from another Korean.

  • BBBBBBBBBBell
    5:25 pm on October 23rd, 2012 4

    @3: Typically these sales occur near US Installations which would lead one to believe they are being sold by Soldiers. Slicky boys seem to be more prevalent around range facilities and would not be selling these goods all the way back in Dongduchon.

  • Setnaffa
    5:33 pm on October 23rd, 2012 5

    http://bluefalconcoin.blogspot.com/2007/07/win-free-blue-falcon-challenge-coin.html

  • Glans
    5:33 pm on October 23rd, 2012 6

    Does this comment thread really not have a subject line, or am I missing something?

  • Tom
    5:43 pm on October 23rd, 2012 7

    The subject line should say “GI’s Steal Military Equipment For Sale and Blame it on Koreans”. Another day at the ROKDROP.

  • guitard
    6:22 pm on October 23rd, 2012 8

    BBBBBBBBBBell wrote:

    Typically these sales occur near US Installations which would lead one to believe they are being sold by Soldiers. Slicky boys seem to be more prevalent around range facilities and would not be selling these goods all the way back in Dongduchon.

    One of the reasons these items are sold near US installations is because that’s where a good chunk of the customer base is located. When my company commander came up short on pro masks in a change-of-command inventory — guess where he went to buy them? The guys running those places can smell desperation from a mile away – and since the CO needed the pro masks RIGHT NOW – he ended up paying dearly for them.

    Of course, some of the stuff is coming from soldiers who stole it from other soldiers (or sold their own equipment and claimed someone stole their stuff). But I also think a lot of it is stolen by people who are not soldiers – at or near installations – and up at the ranges. And even the stuff stolen at the ranges finds its way to these shops because that’s where money is.

  • BBBBBBBBBBell
    6:31 pm on October 23rd, 2012 9

    @8: I agree with everything you are saying. I guess my point was that the vast majority of these products come from a Soldier that needs cash more than anyone else. I was not good at getting that point across.

  • Ole Tanker
    7:18 pm on October 23rd, 2012 10

    Of course this stuff is mostly sold by soldiers for a quick buck$$$.

    The pro’s sell them discretely far away. Like the NOD’s in the late 90′s that ended up in Australia.

    This was probably a typical blackmail play done by someone who demanded more of the take!

    Old timers know this is how most crime is exposed in Korea. :cool:

  • Jinro Dukkohbi
    7:30 pm on October 23rd, 2012 11

    Wow…after 60+ years in operation, they finally busted TA-50 alley in TDC?? I wonder who was a ‘bad boy’ and quit bribing the cops?? :roll:

  • 2ID Doc
    8:24 pm on October 23rd, 2012 12

    I remember an entire tank battalion getting placed on 90 days restriction 90 days extra duty when a .45 Pistol turned up missing after an FTX in the 1980s. The extra duty (and only duty) was retracing the battalion’s steps during the FTX including dragging every body of water they crossed. Some officers were relieved of command, I would bet whoever signed for that pistol was court-martialed. After the division heard about it, suddenly the scuttlebutt dried up like it never happened. Of course, a pistol is a whole lot different than swiping your buddy’s gear for a fast buck.

  • Frankie says Relax
    12:10 am on October 24th, 2012 13

    :shock: More than one palm was greased to get this equipment.

  • Son_of_Anarchy
    12:42 am on October 24th, 2012 14

    Slap some more sanctions on them cause they got no act right and they get to many days off as it is. Now, I got no fight with any soldier who does what he’s told, but when he don’t, the machine breaks down. So, when the machine breaks down, we all break down. :twisted:

  • dongducheonstyle
    1:54 am on October 24th, 2012 15

    There was an M4 in the pawn shop as well. Yes….someone took an M4 from the arms room and sold it to a pawn shop….that’s why this has become a big deal. The articles tactfully fails to mention that KEY piece of information.

  • Bobby Ray
    2:44 am on October 24th, 2012 16

    How much they want for that there M4? When is deer season in Korea?

  • LG DACOM Stinks, Royally
    2:51 am on October 24th, 2012 17

    I have never known of a single instance of “Slicky Boy” getting anything. It might have been the case at one time, but Slicky Boy has now passed into legend. Almost all instances of US military equipment making it to the Korean black market are cases of Soldiers looking for quick cash, or of Korean employees selling old items that were to have been thrown in the trash or destroyed. KATUSAs are also big culprits towards their ETS.

  • Baek In-je
    3:20 am on October 24th, 2012 18

    OPSEC compromised?
    Check.
    Superior American technology in the hands of Chosinjean?
    Check.
    I think the Koreans selling this fall into the category of enemy combatants. They have no rights and should be detained until such time as they provide the names and addresses of those who sold them the stolen items.

  • Jinro Dukkohbi
    4:13 am on October 24th, 2012 19

    During my time ‘back in the day’ in 2ID, slicky boy was alive and well, but generally didn’t want to mess with the sensitive items, not liking the heat they would bring with their theft. Now slicky definitely would grab up your ruck, your sleeping bag, your mickey mouse boots, cases of unsecured MREs, or pretty-much anything else left out unsecured out at a field exercise, but left the weapons and NVGs alone. That didn’t stop GIs from losing sensitive items and I’m sure GIs have even tried to pawn that kind-of stuff, but I never saw slicky messing with any of that.

    If there really was an M4 in that latest heist, unless someone was really resourceful with grinding off the serial number on that weapon, they will know exactly where it came from, most likely right down to the moron that tried to pawn/sell it…so I’m sure heads will roll…

  • Leon LaPorte
    4:20 am on October 24th, 2012 20

    The M-4 would of course be inexcusable, if not down right silly pants. but…

    $18,000 worth of equipment? Pfft. Not even a minor nuisance.

  • Leon LaPorte
    4:22 am on October 24th, 2012 21

    I reckon an M-4 sales for around $1000 in the US, probably go for $2000-4000 here if I had to guess.

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Bushmaster-M4/Browse.aspx?Keywords=Bushmaster+M4

  • Leon LaPorte
    4:23 am on October 24th, 2012 22

    Sells not sales (shakes tiny fist at lack of 5 minute edit button)

  • Stephen
    6:01 am on October 24th, 2012 23

    Which Korean bootlegger was dumb enough to buy an M4? Korean gangs don’t usually need guns for their extortion rackets. Most illegal guns in Korea have been sourced from Russia.

  • Son_of_Anarchy
    3:59 pm on October 24th, 2012 24

    A Basic M-4(AR-15) Military Colt online is about $799-$999.00. It all depends on what size barrel length and extras you want on it.

  • Leon LaPorte
    4:07 pm on October 24th, 2012 25

    Of course the government pays a bit more.

    NSN 1005-01-231-0973
    unit price: $1,141.65
    plus $49.56 (six additional magazines)
    Total: $1,191.21

  • Leon LaPorte
    4:11 pm on October 24th, 2012 26

    Pawning your M-4: Priceless!

 

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