ROK Drop

Avatar of John MacBy on November 26th, 2012 at 6:22 pm

Breaking news: DPRK Engages In Genocide

» by in: North Korea

(Note: This is a guest post by ROK Drop contributor John Mac.)

Picture from Flickr user futureatlas.com

What makes it interesting is the comparison to the Rwanda debacle. Still, even if nothing can or will be done about the wanton slaughter up north, it is good to at least acknowledge that it continues to take place:

On April 6, 1994, in the aftermath of the assassination of Rwandan president Juvenal Habyarimana, a genocide in which Hutu militias slaughtered up to 1 million Tutsis over a 100-day period ensued. It eventually ended in the form of a military victory by the Rwandan Patriotic Front, led by current Rwandan President Paul Kagame. Since then, former President Clinton has stated that the biggest failure of his presidency was not intervening to halt the genocide, and that if the United States had acted, it could have prevented a third of the deaths.

Our current Ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, who served as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs at the time, has also expressed profound regret at not having done more to prevent the genocide, even asserting to Samantha Power in 2001, “I swore to myself that if I ever faced such a crisis again, I would come down on the side of dramatic action, going down in flames if that was required.”

What is never mentioned by these individuals is that at the exact same time one of the most devastating genocides of the post-Holocaust era was also taking place in North Korea, which at its peak claimed the lives of over 2,000 people a day. Over a three-year period, an estimated 3.5 million Korean lives were lost in spite of one of the largest international aid efforts in modern history. Though billions in aid was sent to North Korea, more than enough to feed the entire population, government and academic studies reveal that North Korea diverted the funds to strengthen its military while systematically preventing food from reaching the hardest-hit areas.  [Forbes]

Read the rest at the link.

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25
  • Hamilton
    5:52 pm on November 26th, 2012 1

    Genocide is not the word you are looking for.

    Mass-murder maybe.

  • Teadrinker
    6:45 pm on November 26th, 2012 2

    “What is never mentioned by these individuals is that at the exact same time one of the most devastating genocides of the post-Holocaust era was also taking place in North Korea, which at its peak claimed the lives of over 2,000 people a day.”

    Genocide? Someone needs a new thesaurus. They are using starvation for the purpose of social engineering, just like the Russians and the Chinese did before them.

  • Glans
    7:47 pm on November 26th, 2012 3

    You sure its deliberate? Could be depraved indifference.

  • Kagura 4-2 INF
    7:50 pm on November 26th, 2012 4

    Why does this say “breaking news”? Is that some sort of satire?

  • Kagura 4-2 INF
    8:05 pm on November 26th, 2012 5

    #2,

    North Korea was hit simultaneously by the collapse of the Soviet Union, worsening relations with Communist China, several natural disasters in a row, terrible agricultural policies, as well as the complete and utter collapse of the government ration distribution/transportation system outside of the greater Pyongyang area, all at the same time.

    North Korea’s “March of Tribulation” was an accident and not purposeful, although you can bet that rations were procured for favored classes of population over others.

    Also, I really think the title of this post is dishonest and I won’t be giving the author page hits for silly “tactics” like this.

  • MTB Rider
    8:17 pm on November 26th, 2012 6

    @5
    Right. A “Breaking News: DPRK Engages in Genocide” article would be about the DPRK rolling their tanks over all the outlying villages and shooting everyone, while ransacking the current harvest.

    As it is, there is no real change in the conditions, just the steady sinking into quicksand. So, outside of trying to shame Hillary Clinton, Susan Rice or Barack Obama into doing something, I don’t see the point of the article’s title.

  • JoeC
    8:38 pm on November 26th, 2012 7

    People use words like genocide, holocaust and cannibalism to evoke as much horror and urgency as they can to a cause. I don’t think North Korea is deliberately and systematically trying to eradicate it’s entire population of Koreans.

    What happened in Rwanda met the definition of genocide. What’s happening in North Korea does not.

    BTW. The author of this Forbes article in Robert Park, remember him? The fact that he probably still has and sees demons everywhere maybe colors this article.

  • Teadrinker
    9:34 pm on November 26th, 2012 8

    #5,

    Accidental? Need I remind you that the Soviet Union collapsed two decades ago?

  • Tom
    10:05 pm on November 26th, 2012 9

    LOL…. Forbes…

  • Avatar of John MacJohn Mac
    11:26 pm on November 26th, 2012 10

    Well, Genocide was used in the title of the linked article, it wasn’t my word. “Breaking News” was indeed an attempt at satire.

    #5 Not sure whose page hits you are talking about. I certainly don’t link back to my blog. I was just sharing an article of topical interest. My only point was that whatever you call it, it is a good thing to keep the human rights violations in the DPRK in the news.

    Geez, tough crowd here.

  • comfortable.chairs
    1:29 am on November 27th, 2012 11

    #10,

    Know your audience.
    How many posts on this site have you ever seen that had satire?

    This isn’t a satire audience. Sorry.

    Decent enough article though.

  • kushibo
    1:57 am on November 27th, 2012 12

    Tom wrote:

    LOL…. Forbes…

    I guess someone from China would think that genocide is laugh-out-loud amusing.

    What’s happening in North Korea is not amusing. What happened in China, despite the numbing disregard for the little people that is held by the Chinese elite, is disgusting as well.

  • kushibo
    2:13 am on November 27th, 2012 13

    Is “genocide” the right word?

    Can what we see in North Korea be described as murder?

    While one might successfully argue that massive death due to agricultural failures in the wake of Beijing and Moscow pulling the plug is not deliberate killing, it is clear that North Korea makes enough to feed its people today and has been using food as a weapon in its bid to control the populace. That is deliberate killing.

    And while the word “genocide” most typically refers to the killing of a large group of people of a particular ethnicity or nation, it is not restricted to that and can be used to refer to classes of people, as in North Korea’s case.

    So I’d say the answers are yes and yes.

  • kushibo
    2:25 am on November 27th, 2012 14

    Geez, tough crowd here.

    People don’t like change. ROK Drop, for example, is a good blog because of its comprehensiveness and the straightforward way in which the author (usually GI Korea) introduces topics. Meanwhile, blogs like The Marmot’s Hole, for example, are well read because they present some of the more pertinent stories with a well thought-out analysis that is balanced and informed.

    When guest bloggers come and write differently from that, some people can react negatively, as if someone dumped orange juice in their corn flakes. I’ve been known to knock guest bloggers at The Hole who were just plain sloppy and idiotic while proclaiming themselves as journalists, but that I really felt I was protecting the integrity of the blog.

    Here, I don’t see that as an issue with your work, at least judging from this. I don’t think your satire/sarcasm/irony is entirely out of line.

  • Avatar of GI KoreaGI Korea
    4:04 am on November 27th, 2012 15

    I got the satire that John included in the title, but I can get how people may not catch satire on a blog. Anyway I appreciate John providing a few posts, I hope more readers decide to do so as well, so be nice to John. :grin:

  • Glans
    5:59 am on November 27th, 2012 16

    kushibo, orange juice on cornflakes is a good, nutritious breakfast. I enjoy it, and hungry North Koreans might enjoy it, too. If it can be distributed to them, and not diverted to the elite.

    I don’t know, but I would expect that, like most people, North Koreans become lactose intolerant after infancy. Therefore, I wouldn’t give them milk on cornflakes.

  • JoeC
    11:41 am on November 27th, 2012 17

    I guess satire is even harder to detect when it’s from a foreign language source, but isn’t The Onion internationally known to be a satirical publication by now?

    The People’s Daily on Tuesday ran a 55-page photo spread on its website in a tribute to the round-faced leader, under the headline “North Korea’s top leader named The Onion’s Sexiest Man Alive for 2012.”

    Quoting The Onion’s spoof report, the Chinese newspaper wrote, `’With his devastatingly handsome, round face, his boyish charm, and his strong, sturdy frame, this Pyongyang-bred heartthrob is every woman’s dream come true.”

    “Blessed with an air of power that masks an unmistakable cute, cuddly side, Kim made this newspaper’s editorial board swoon with his impeccable fashion sense, chic short hairstyle, and, of course, that famous smile,” the People’s Daily cited The Onion as saying.

    A 55-page photo spread? Eeewwwww!!!

  • mg
    5:51 pm on November 27th, 2012 18

    #5, I wouldn’t describe willfully pursuing argicultural policies that were failing long before the 1990s as an accident. Blocking outside aid at the initial onslaught of the famine was certainly not an accident. It certainly wasn’t genocide, but it also certainly was not an accident either.

  • chefantwon
    6:38 pm on November 27th, 2012 19

    Really, genocide? /sarc

    There was a bit of notice IF the DPRK ever tried to find out that the Soviet Union was headed down the drain. In a word Yeltsin. The problems with China could have been lessoned IF again the DPRK even noticed that the Soviet Union was kaput and they had to get food from somebody close. The floods could not have been prevented, however, a bit less on the central planning and more on the stockpiling of the harvest could have helped.

    The DPRK isn’t in the wholesale killing of it’s population, just those who pose a threat to the masses. While a few million less peseants is quite helpfull in the cause of feeding those who remain, it does have an effect of less people to harvest the crops. I guess that’s what the army is for since they get more of the food now a days.

  • Teadrinker
    9:42 pm on November 27th, 2012 20

    #13,

    “While one might successfully argue that massive death due to agricultural failures in the wake of Beijing and Moscow pulling the plug is not deliberate killing, it is clear that North Korea makes enough to feed its people today and has been using food as a weapon in its bid to control the populace. That is deliberate killing. ”

    That’s the point I was getting at. Their economy suffering because Russia pulled the plug is one thing, letting people starve is another. You can’t blame the collapse of the Soviet Union anymore since that happened 20 years. As you say, it is deliberate.

  • Teadrinker
    9:45 pm on November 27th, 2012 21

    20 years ago, that is.

  • Glans
    5:48 am on November 28th, 2012 22

    Intentionally cutting their own population, increasing the numerical superiority of the south? Reducing the recruiting pool of their own armed forces? That sounds to me not like a plan but like a stupid mistake.

  • jim
    5:32 pm on November 29th, 2012 23

    there’s no such thing as moderate satire.

  • Hank Song
    5:20 pm on December 1st, 2012 24

    The girl in the picture is Jinhye Jo, a North Korean defector who has resettled in the US. She went on a two-weeks long hunger strike in front of the old Chinese Embassy in Washington DC in 2008 to protest the forced repatriation of North Korean refugees by the Chicoms (the picture above is from her hunger strike). CNN did an in-depth story on her and her family: http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/24/us/north-korean-refugees/index.html

  • The Korean
    11:19 pm on December 1st, 2012 25

    Genocide is a wrong term, its more like the government doesn’t care about its people (except for the elite and party members). This was already known since the 1980s.

 

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