ROK Drop

Avatar of GI KoreaBy on January 26th, 2013 at 6:24 pm

Korean Court Issues Death Sentence to Ulsan Double Murderer

He may have been issued a death sentence but it will be interesting to see if he is ever executed because Korea has not executed anyone since 1997:

A court yesterday handed down a death sentence to Kim Hong-il, 25, who brutally murdered his ex-girlfriend and her sister in Ulsan last year.

The Ulsan District Court headed by Senior Judge Seong Geum-seok sentenced Kim to be executed.

A crowd in the court, which included relatives of the murdered sisters, cheered the sentence and gave judges a standing ovation.

“We couldn’t see signs of sincere penitence in the suspect,” Judge Seong said in the ruling. “He took two sisters’ precious lives in three minutes and 20 seconds. He systematically planned the murder and was able to put the plan into action because he had a strong will to kill.

“There is a possibility the suspect might turn into a better person in the future,” the judge continued, “but the essence of the crime was so bad that giving him a death sentence is the way to protect good people from such crimes.”  [Joong Ang Ilbo]

You can read more details about this crime at this prior ROK Drop posting.

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16
  • Tom
    6:37 pm on January 26th, 2013 1

    Why does the Korean guys gets the death sentence, but that Chinese guy who killed a woman for her human meat to sell on the Chinese market, doesn’t?

  • Leon LaPorte
    8:34 pm on January 26th, 2013 2

    Odds of the sentence actually being carried out? Anyone? Anyone?

  • Bobby Ray
    9:44 pm on January 26th, 2013 3

    That Chinese guy wasn’t near as bad cause he was helping Korea’s export based economy.

  • John from Daejeon
    10:07 pm on January 26th, 2013 4

    The Korea without courts is still doing more than its share of executions to make up for the lack of executions in the Korea with courts.

  • LostinKorea
    8:36 am on January 27th, 2013 5

    Is it really necessary to censor the handcuffs? (Or is he wearing a sexual object that wraps his wrists?)

  • Teadrinker
    9:28 am on January 27th, 2013 6

    #5,

    To spare him the indignity, maybe? If that’s the case, this is quite ironic as many would argue that capital punishment is cruel and inhuman.

  • Conway Eastwood
    12:28 pm on January 27th, 2013 7

    #5

    It’s like what the Japanese do with their porn. Censored porn = What’s the point?

  • kushibo
    12:35 pm on January 27th, 2013 8

    The Korea without courts is still doing more than its share of executions to make up for the lack of executions in the Korea with courts.

    True that.

    Leon LaPorte wrote:

    Odds of the sentence actually being carried out? Anyone? Anyone?

    Close to zero, but not zero.

    As in the US, where lately Korea’s right (particularly the religious right) has been getting a lot of its political cues, demand for continued use of the death penalty is a red-meat issue designed to whip up support, with the added occasional benefit of eclipsing a need to discuss reform of an unfair judicial system. Remember when folks like Bill Clinton had to state their support for capital punishment to prove they weren’t “soft on crime,” a label frequently used to smear “liberals”?

    In South Korea, there had been a move away from support of the death penalty, largely because South Koreans were looking at Europe as a civilized model. Under Roman Catholic Kim Daejung (who escaped a death sentence himself) and leftist Roh Moohyun, capital punishment was all but banned.

    Under Lee Myungbak, there were whispers and then shouts that it should be enforced, that the Kim DJ moratorium should end. Park Geunhye may feel a need to give in to that momentum or even harness it herself. That makes it above zero, though it’s not clear how much.

    But President Park should be keenly aware how unseemly it will look if the daughter of the man who so abused the death penalty — who actually stands as a symbol of its abuse in South Korea — were to be the one who brings it back. That brings it back closer to zero from wherever it was.

  • Leon LaPorte
    4:25 pm on January 27th, 2013 9

    8. Good analysis. I tend to agree with you.

  • Glans
    4:54 pm on January 27th, 2013 10

    When did Korea ban leaded gasoline?

  • Setnaffa
    4:56 pm on January 27th, 2013 11

    Kushibo conveniently skirts the fact that liberals are soft on crime.

  • tbonetylr
    7:14 pm on January 27th, 2013 12

    Tom,
    “Why does the Korean guys gets the death sentence, but that Chinese guy who killed a woman for her human meat to sell on the Chinese market, doesn’t?”

    Because the Chinese guy shouldn’t have ever been able to kill the woman had the Korean police done their jobs and responded to her phone call in a reasonable amount of time :roll:

  • kushibo
    1:41 am on January 28th, 2013 13

    Leon LaPorte wrote:

    8. Good analysis. I tend to agree with you.

    Thanks, LLP. I turned my comment here into its own post.

    setnaffa wrote:

    Kushibo conveniently skirts the fact that liberals are soft on crime.

    Trying to reduce crime by curbing the various factors that cause or contribute to it, as opposed to reacting to it after it has happened? Sounds soft, yeah.

  • Glans
    9:06 am on January 28th, 2013 14

    “As of June 2011, unleaded automotive gasoline is available almost universally throughout the world and the only countries in which leaded gasoline is the only type available are Burma and Afghanistan; Leaded gasoline also remains available in Algeria, Georgia, Iraq, North Korea, and Yemen,” says Wikipedia. Those privileged youngsters in Pyongyang, where cars are concentrated, are being poisoned. They’ll continue to have elevated rates of cognitive and behavioral issues.

    I found this on the Internet. I have no idea of its reliability, but it says South Korea banned leaded gasoline in 1993. If so, crime rates should be falling now or soon. Going forward, there will be less need for the death penalty.

  • Leon LaPorte
    5:29 pm on January 28th, 2013 15

    14. But the South Koreans still vaccinate children, therefore driving the crime rate back up.

  • Glans
    5:35 pm on January 28th, 2013 16

    15. LOL. But, seriously, does anyone know when South Korea banned leaded fuel? It would be interesting to look at crime rates twenty years later.

 

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