ROK Drop

Avatar of GI KoreaBy on March 9th, 2013 at 5:19 am

Road Rage Incident Involving US Contractor Makes National Headlines In Korea

You would think that this idiot would realize that at a time like now with all the Korean media attention on GI crime that any little thing committed by anyone associated with USFK will make national headlines:

PYEONGTAEK, South Korea, March 9 (Yonhap) — A U.S. Army mechanic working in South Korea was caught by police for threatening a South Korean citizen with a knife during a road dispute, officers here said Saturday.

A 48-year-old aircraft maintenance crew member from the 8th U.S. Army, identified only by the initial J, allegedly threatened a 42-year-old South Korean citizen, known as Choi, with a knife the previous day while having an argument over a near accident involving their cars on a street in Pyeongtaek, some 70 kilometers south of Seoul.

He has been handed over to the U.S. military police to face investigation, according to the Pyeongtaek Police Station.
The U.S. employee is also suspected of scratching Choi’s car twice with the knife when Choi was trying to escape from the threat, it added.

Unable to retreat, Choi threatened J with a rock he had picked up and lied, saying he was a police officer, the station said. Upon hearing this, J fled but was soon caught by actual police officers.

The man, known as a Korean-American, was not intoxicated at the time, and admitted his wrongdoings upon his arrest, according to the investigators. [Yonhap]

Maybe this idiot was thinking that since I am a Korean-American contractor no one will realize that I am associated with USFK and thus can act the fool? The Marmot’s Hole has more on this story to include the contractor saying that Choi nearly killed him by running a red light and when he confronted Choi through his passenger window he moved his car causing him to fall. When he fell he says Choi came at him with rock thus he went back to his car to get his fishing knife. The Marmot’s Hole has a link to a Donga TV video where it is hard to make out who is at fault in this incident.

Even if this is all true the contractor will get the most of the blame and it is not because he is USFK. In Korea if you pull out a knife on someone it is like pulling a gun on someone in the US. It is a big escalation of the situation. Just ask the Private John Humphrey what happens if you pull out a knife even if you are being assaulted, choked, and beaten by a mob.

Tags: , , , ,
- 2,992 views
38
  • Smokes
    6:41 am on March 9th, 2013 1

    Yet another reminder to keep your cool here; you’ll never end up winning in the end. :(

  • Flunky Brewster
    4:10 pm on March 9th, 2013 2

    Where exactly in Pyeongtaek was this? Note: Pyeongtaek is a big city.

  • Flunky Brewster
    4:33 pm on March 9th, 2013 3

    After seeing the TV report, now I know where it happened.
    One thing that happens with many Korean-Americans, in Korea, is that if they have Korean family members they tend to think they are more Korean than Korean-American, and they act like it, in positive and negative ways. It’s the combination of that security blanket of having family here, and knowing the culture and the language. Having said that, it’s obvious that suspect in this case understood enough about Korean laws and customs to admit everything when arrested and act in a humble manner when those of us who are new to Korea would probably deny everything or try to straighten things out by laying the blame on the other side. Why does it matter?
    It matters because it’s obvious that when the suspect is off-duty he doesn’t think of himself as a part of USFK. He might even be the kind of person who laughs off any warnings by the upper command to behave as someone else’s problem. He’s obviously old enough to know better and he’s been around the military long enough to understand how USFK is viewed by many in Korea.
    While every enlisted soldier has probably been Read the Riot Act all week, you just knew the next fool was going to either be an officer or an older contractor. The enlisted soldiers have felt like all eyes were on them while the high-ups like this contractor were just crumpling up the memos about the importance of good behavior off post and laughing it off as not their problem. Right now it’s everyone’s problem and it’s everyone’s responsibility.

  • Steven
    8:06 pm on March 9th, 2013 4

    Road rage is no excuse for either man to act like maniacs in broad daylight with cars all around them.

  • Mongoose
    8:22 pm on March 9th, 2013 5

    I myself would like to go on such rampant rage trip. Koreans are real a-holes when it comes to driving. I now think their dispositions are such that whenever they smile at me, I feel like their facades are fake as oppose to their driving behaviors.

    If there is a war with NK, I think is imminent, SKorea will turn into one complete utter chaos. There will be no lining up to wait for bread, water, rice, whatever like the Japanese did after the Tsunami.

  • Jack
    9:49 pm on March 9th, 2013 6

    I know this guy and that intersection both very well. People run through that red light all the time and J should have known better than to go after him like that. People don’t like to stop at the light because there is only one small road coming in from the side that is rarely used. If it wasn’t for people doing Uturns the light would be basically useless. There is a small amount of traffic from the side road but not much. Both guys are obviously at fault, no excuses. Best just to control your anger and let it be in those situations. Both of them probably wish they could take their actions and reactions back about now.

  • Flunky Brewster
    10:40 pm on March 9th, 2013 7

    6- Drivers fly down that road, from both directions, and Koreans have a thing for viewing red lights as optional. But getting out of your vehicle when no accident happened is just plain foolish and people have been killed for doing just that. Dealing with jerks on the road can be aggravating but you gotta be smarter than that.

  • Jack
    11:00 pm on March 9th, 2013 8

    7 – I agree. It was stupid. I thought I did a pretty good job of conveying that in my original post but I guess not.

  • Leon LaPorte
    11:14 pm on March 9th, 2013 9

    6. The Korea could care less. He will not be punished.

  • Eric
    11:58 pm on March 9th, 2013 10

    After watching the video it looks like J was trying to stab the driver. Maybe J should of deleted his car’s blackbox video footage, lol.

    Video: http://news.ichannela.com/society/3/03/20130309/53574733/1

  • JoeC
    12:48 am on March 10th, 2013 11

    “He has been handed over to the U.S. military police to face investigation, according to the Pyeongtaek Police Station.”

    Why?

  • Baek In-je
    1:21 am on March 10th, 2013 12

    1. Mr. Initial J would have NEVER gotten out of his car to confront another driver in America. I hope he tries that in Los Angeles.
    2. If he has traveled that road before, and from Jack’s post it seems that Mr. Initial J has, then he would know that Koreans do not want to stop at that red light.
    3. Please understand my culture.
    4. Flunky Brewster is right: “Koreans have a thing for viewing red lights as optional.” This is evil. It shows a basic lack of respect for human life.
    5. If you are going to get out of your car to confront every Korean who drives like a jerk here in the Land of the Moaning Clam, you’ll never make it to your destination before sunrise.

  • guitard
    6:00 am on March 10th, 2013 13

    JoeC wrote:

    “He has been handed over to the U.S. military police to face investigation, according to the Pyeongtaek Police Station.”

    Why?

    Speculation on my part . . . but it’s probably because USFK can exact much greater pain than the Korean justice system.

    If the US side handles this – he’s gonna lose his job, his employer will not provide a favorable reference for any future employment, and he’ll be sent back to the US.

    If the Korean side handles it, he will be able to take care of it with an apology and one or two million won settlement – and no further record. USFK might not even ever find out about it.

  • tbonetylr
    3:37 pm on March 10th, 2013 14

    A female co-worker of mine once came to work with a hat on which she wore very low, I could barely see her eyes. Later in the day after getting a few good looks at her I noticed she had a black eye. She explained that her brother was in an accident and she was in the back seat but somehow got involved in the rumble after the accident. :cool:

  • BEAVIS
    4:28 pm on March 10th, 2013 15

    “I am the Great Cornholio! I come from Lake Titicaca! M-heh heh, yeah, Titicaca! Titty-kaka! You have awakened my bunghole, and now you must pay! The streets will flow with the blood of the nonbelievers! I need TP for my bunghole! Are you threatening me? My bunghole will not wait! You are a bunghole! And so am I! There will be more bungholes after me! I shall claim this land for my bunghole! Long live the Almighty bunghole!!”

    http://youtu.be/N7MMTwIlWlU

  • Lazy_Contractor
    8:21 pm on March 11th, 2013 16

    “3. Please understand my culture.”

    Sh!tty, dangerous driving is not a culture. All to often “locals” will hide behind the word “culture” as an excuse for poor behavior, driving or otherwise.

  • Lazy_Contractor
    8:26 pm on March 11th, 2013 17

    Additionally, I am not saying the contractor (Mr. “J”) is in the right. Bother parties are wrong. I drive this route EVERYDAY. I can understand why someone – Korean OR American – would get frustrated and want to assault another driver for nearly killing them. I ASSUME people run the red light at that U-Turn. So I just sit until the oncoming traffic comes to a complete stop.

  • Flunky Brewster
    9:33 pm on March 11th, 2013 18

    16- If someone is Korean-American, with Korean family in Korea, and they have lived in Korea for years then they should understand how things are in Korea, the good and the bad. How much effort does that take for someone who is more Korean than American? Plus, even if he doesn’t think that he’s part of USFK when off-duty, he sure is part of USFK. That means act responsibly, especially at his age. He’s not some 21 year old overseas for the first time.

  • Mongoose
    1:38 am on March 12th, 2013 19

    Nobody gives a hoot out here in the ROK because we all know that there are those drivers who just don’t drive normally. They think they are some hotshot race car drivers. I don’t know where they got that notion but they drive with recklessness.

    But, obviously, this Komerican may have thought that he was special ’cause he was an American or he would not be prosecuted. What he did was wrong but I could understand the little guy. Although many normal people would have kept their cool.

  • Baek In-je
    1:48 am on March 12th, 2013 20

    “Nobody gives a hoot out here in the ROK because we all know that there are those drivers who just don’t drive normally.”

    This is why all 48 million South Koreans are complicit in the vehicular manslaughter that is South Korean roads. In my culture, American culture, we prize and value life as precious. It saddens me that you people don’t feel the same way in South Korea. So many people have to be killed and maimed each day because South Koreans will not drive like adults. We don’t do it like this in my developed country. Please understand my culture, driving like people do in South Korea is morally wrong.

  • kangaji
    5:40 am on March 12th, 2013 21

    Baek – were you in sales in Korea also? It seems like you’re venting from being in customers service and having to kiss ass all day?

  • Mooseknuckle
    6:22 am on March 12th, 2013 22

    Does this mean the childish rules that apply only to Soldiers will now apply to contracters because one of them got out of line?

  • Mongoose
    6:43 pm on March 12th, 2013 23

    #20: I know now that you are one BSing anal-something that isn’t what you make yourself out to be. You ain’t no “American”.

    You are nothing but a loser of some nationality.

    Your writing style is as American as Kimchi left out in the open in dog days of Korean summer for an hour long.

    And whatever you are : Phuck you too.

  • Baek In-je
    7:34 pm on March 12th, 2013 24

    Kangaji,
    I’ve seen two people run down and killed in Korea, one of which the driver didn’t slow down or swerve to miss the poor bastard just trying to run across the road. I saw a woman run into the crosswalk the instant the light turned green and the bus running the red light would have run her over if she was a half second quicker. SHE ran into the side of a bus travelling 35MPH, knocking her out and she was stuffed into a taxi to be taken to the ER. I dodge motorcycle in crosswalks and on sidewalks daily. Now, with the bus lanes, you need to look both ways continuously crossing streets, and if the arrows are running down, you have to dodge people driving through the red lights.
    I am genuinely scared to cross the street here. I don’t want to be hit by someone 8282ing to nowhere special. The traffic here is as close to anarchy as it comes.
    (And no, Mr. Kangaji, I am not in sales. nd I never kiss ass, obviously).

  • Mongoose
    1:53 am on March 13th, 2013 25

    #20,I don’t give a rat’s ass what American culture is like when it comes to driving ’cause at least here we never have high speed chases unless some doped up GI wanted it. That GI BB gun thing with a high speed car chase was a first for this city.

    Nevertheless, if any of you are in country for the first time, do look to your right and to your left whenever and wherever you are. You don’t want to be run down by a crazed kimchi driver or a motorcycle delivery.

    A cross-walk green light doesn’t necessarily mean you can walk across without jeopardizing your health. A red traffic light doesn’t mean that a car would stop for you. It is phucked up. Really.

  • Baek In-je
    4:09 am on March 13th, 2013 26

    1) “I don’t give a rat’s ass…” Tired old cliche? Check.”

    2) “…’cause at least here we never have high speed chases unless some doped up GI wanted it.” Because the police are as lazy as the average Korean and will not do their job? Check.

    3) ” That GI BB gun thing with a high speed car chase was a first for this city.” First high speed chase in 600 years of Seoul as the capital city? Sounds about right. Check.

    4)”Nevertheless, if any of you are in country for the first time, do look to your right and to your left whenever and wherever you are. You don’t want to be run down by a crazed kimchi driver or a motorcycle delivery.” (Note to readers…whether you have been here 1 day or 100 years, this is sound advice.)

    5)”A cross-walk green light doesn’t necessarily mean you can walk across without jeopardizing your health. A red traffic light doesn’t mean that a car would stop for you.” Only in the Land of the Moaning Clam.

    6) Getting advice from RokDrop’s #2 troll? Priceless.

  • Andy
    4:23 am on March 13th, 2013 27

    I laughed my azz off when I first came to Korea and seen a totally boxed in traffic jam at a 4 way intersection. (The streets were only wide enough for 1 car even though cars could go in either direction) Each street was at least 10 cars deep! I was wondering what happened to the One Way signs! Hilarious!

  • kangaji
    5:40 am on March 13th, 2013 28

    Wait, BIJ is calling Mongoose ROKDROP.com’s #2 troll?

  • kangaji
    5:47 am on March 13th, 2013 29

    #24: Yeah, I’ve almost been run over a couple of times myself. So you’ve spent 20 years on and off in Korea? I’m honestly jealous you found some kind of niche in Korea to get employed/passive income that long there without teaching English/being a DA civilian and you hate it so much. Did you like Korea once and just get too tied to it to leave?

  • Glans
    7:04 am on March 13th, 2013 30

    Baek In-je is modestly claiming the number-one spot for himself. Way to go, bro!

  • Baek In-je
    9:10 pm on March 15th, 2013 31

    I love Korea. But the “ajosshis ruin everything”.

  • Mongoose
    12:30 am on March 16th, 2013 32

    #31. No blo-job. You don’t love Korea at all. You know nothing about it.
    Anyway, people. You don’t have to worry about being hit with a BB gun pellet or run over by a high speed car chase in Korea but you do need to worry about the Zzazangmyun delivery motorbikes at warp speed.

  • Baek In-je
    2:44 am on March 16th, 2013 33

    Mongoose,
    Don’t talk about blowjobs with other men. That comes off really creepy.
    And I know EVERTHING about Korea…that’s my problem.

  • Mongoose
    6:31 am on March 16th, 2013 34

    #33, Blo-Jo,

    I think you do think about it all the time with other men.
    No, you really do not know ANYTHING about Korea.

  • Baek In-je
    7:40 pm on March 16th, 2013 35

    Well…you know….there were no the gay before the US army came to the Korea…so, best to ask your father about it.
    Yes, I know EVERYTHING about Korea….including the lies Koreans pass off, especially history lies. Those are pathetic. Lying about history to make it seem less pathetic. Crazy sh!t like assassin worship, you know, that guy who killed the Japanese governor in China, who is someone Koreans look up to. Also, the W50,000 has a famous women on it, but the government gave her a V-line jaw. haha. Some things (people) never change.
    Anyway, this is the last time I will reply to you, Mr. Mongoose. I don’t play well with ajosshis. Stop responding to my comments; I won’t acknowledge you.

  • Don
    8:23 am on May 26th, 2013 36

    almost every car in Korea has CCTV with audio recording all the time. not a smart idea to lose your cool when the person records back and front.

  • JoeC
    9:38 am on May 26th, 2013 37

    #36

    Huh?? I’ve been in many Koreans’ cars. Never noticed or heard of any with CCTV.

    I also think there is some law or rule in Korea that there must be some visible notice of the presence of CCTV cameras in Korea. Even the public official cameras require such a notice.

  • guitard
    5:09 pm on May 26th, 2013 38

    Rather than CCTV, you should say black box camera – as they are known in both English and Korean (블랙박스).

    I would say around 1/3 of Korean cars have them (especially nice cars) and that number is growing steadily.

    Typically they have a blue light that flashes every few seconds, so you can easily see them.

 

RSS feed for comments on this post | TrackBack URI

By submitting a comment here you grant this site a perpetual license to reproduce your words and name/web site in attribution.

Bad Behavior has blocked 30159 access attempts in the last 7 days.