ROK Drop

Avatar of GI KoreaBy on December 2nd, 2013 at 4:59 pm

Tweet of the Day: Samsung Power Transition

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8
  • Bob
    10:50 pm on December 2nd, 2013 1

    A publicly traded multinational shouldn’t be run like a small family business.

  • ChickenHead
    11:57 pm on December 2nd, 2013 2

    Bob, I used to agree…

    …until I noticed how many CEOs with no attachment to the company get hired only to make short term decisions that get them big bonuses on top of big salaries… and then fired with another big bonus.

    With that in consideration, owning shares in a family business run by a family that cares about their business doesn’t seem like a bad investment.

    The price of Samsung shares might indicate it is a reasonable way of thinking.

  • tbonetylr
    1:31 am on December 3rd, 2013 3

    “The price of Samsung shares might indicate it is a reasonable way of thinking.”

    What the hell else are Koreans suppose to invest in, more homes?

    Korean nepotism at its finest.

    Is It Time for Samsung to List in the U.S.?
    http://blogs.wsj.com/korearealtime/2013/10/01/time-for-a-samsung-us-market-listing/
    “For those brave enough to trade shares of Samsung in thinly-traded U.S. over-the-counter markets, meantime, there’s a different risk altogether: transparency is limited, and liquidity can be so scarce that fewer than 100 transactions take place on any given day. Add the usual foreign-exchange uncertainties, and it’s no wonder you don’t find too many ordinary U.S. investors holding Samsung shares.
    Which brings us to Samsung’s corporate management, and its attempts to energize the company’s stock price. Samsung’s Korea-listed shares have fallen by about 10% this year even as the company has pushed its quarterly profits to new record highs and extended its market share lead over Apple — a situation that has vexed company executives.”

  • tbonetylr
    1:43 am on December 3rd, 2013 4

    Here is her photo but as President of “Everland”(taken from Michael Jackson’s Netherland Ranch he lived from 1988?) she has done well at keeping Disney World out of S. Korea which I’ve heard was coming since 2005. For the children :!:
    http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/article.aspx?aid=2981412&cloc=joongangdaily|home|newslist1

    The name of the park is of note, as the name “Everland” is English. In Korean, the name is approximated as “Ebeoraendeu” – in other words, there is no authentic Korean name for the park. This park was formerly called “Jayeon Nongwon” which roughly means “Natural Farm”.[citation needed] Its former English name was “Farmland”.[3]

  • ChickenHead
    4:42 am on December 3rd, 2013 5

    Tbone, I’m not sure of your point.

    In the last decade, the share price has gone up about 7 or 8 times. That’s a pretty good return on an investment. Apart from bored writers angry they can’t easily speculate on Samsung stock, and those who really don’t grasp much beyond pop finance, who dares to complain about that?

    Samsung pays poor dividends… but that’s OK… because, as of now, they seem to be wisely reinvesting that money in growth-oriented endeavors… which secures the value of the stock as a long-term investment rather than the current American market which, much like the recent housing market, seems more based on hopeful speculation… and very well could be an equally dangerous bubble.

    The American management fad of focusing on immediate share price instead of long-term company performance has really had a negative effect on American corporations… especially when so much effort goes into short-term schemes to manipulate the current share price on the current CEO’s watch instead of long-term plans with a solid long-term payoff.

    In the end, I prefer to invest with companies which have long-term upper managers that have a personal investment of labor and pride in the company and work on long-term growth. I am less interested in companies that talk more about their share price.

    Your investment strategy may vary.

  • Tom
    5:16 am on December 3rd, 2013 6

    Samsung is the second most profitable IT company in the world after Apple. Their executives don’t loot their company like the US executives do, by overpaying themselves to bankruptcies. Now some snot nosed English teacher tells them how to run their own company. What a laugh. :lol:

  • ChickenHead
    5:53 am on December 3rd, 2013 7

    +1 for Tom

  • setnaffa
    1:37 pm on December 3rd, 2013 8

    Dang! I agree with both Tom and CH…

    Must be the end of the world…

 

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