ROK Drop

Avatar of GI KoreaBy on March 4th, 2014 at 3:55 am

LG Chem to Expand Electric Car Battery Operations In China

LG Chem thinks that electric cars are soon going to catch on in China due to the pollution situation there:

CEO and Vice Chairman Park Jin-soo says LG Chem may build an electric battery plant in China in anticipation of strong growth of electric vehicles in the world’s largest automobile market, as the country tries to deal with its air pollution crisis.

LG Chem, which supplies EV batteries for General Motors’ Volt, has a small battery manufacturing factory in Nanjing.

“We are studying how many orders we could win there and other legal preparations,” Park said Friday. “I think the EV market in China can rise fast.”  [Joong Ang Ilbo]

Electric cars will catch on when they become affordable and have comparable range to cars that use gasoline.  Anyway I have to wonder if the Chinese will pay LG Chem workers to do nothing like the US government does for the LG Chem plant in the US?

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  • Bob
    3:47 pm on March 4th, 2014 1

    “Electric cars will catch on when they become affordable and have comparable range to cars that use gasoline.”

    The technology is there. I think the source of the problem is actually that car manufacturers are unwilling to pay for tech they didn’t develop on their own or which was developed by their partners. We’re basically made to suffer because of greed.

  • Smokes
    5:37 pm on March 4th, 2014 2

    I wonder how much gas is required to power the charging devices to keep a fully electric car going for a month…

    Not saying it’s more, just wondering. :?:

  • Smokes
    5:51 pm on March 4th, 2014 3

    Oh wow! There’s this thing the internet where you can use engines (electrically powered) to search, and it says:
    “A 2007 study by the non-profit Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) calculated that powering a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) would cost the equivalent of roughly 75 cents per gallon of gasoline”

    Ok, the sutdy’s a lil dated but… “Electric Power Research Institute” sounds like it could be fishy so I’d want to delve into who they are before repeating their claims as cannon. They also based it on a hybrid which leads me to ask “Why not do the test on a full electric? What’s to hide? We want to know about the electric tech not the hybrid tech.”

    Elsewhere it’s said: “Plug In America estimates that it will cost $2 to $4 to fully charge an all-electric car.”
    Ok! Full electric that’s what we’re looking for but umm…. “Plug In America”? Really? How can anyone take information from a company that appears to be named by the Obama Administration’s Naming Team as unbiased dope?

    Let’s pretend the claims are accurate, they don’t mention if they factor in how much the cost of electric will rise if we ditch the gas pumps for elecrtic sockets. They also don’t factor in this is a whole new infrastructure that needs to be established, one that’ll cost a sh*tgillion dollars to setup and you just think the companies involved will just suck that up as “oh well cost of doing business”. Of course it’s going to get passed down to the customer.

  • ChickenHead
    8:29 pm on March 4th, 2014 4

    Smokes,

    The answer is long and complex. Here are some key points…

    Electric cars as the standard would be more efficient than gas cars as the standard.

    Switching to an electric car standard requires much more energy, effort, sacrifice, expense, etc., than continuing to produce gas cars.

    If it is never done, it won’t get done… so government, industry, and society must painfully do it at some point.

    There will be no cost reduction in hardware or usage costs for the end user… as all expenses will be passes on through product cost or taxation.

    Companies know what consumers will pay for transportation. Government knows the bell curve of what they will pay per mile without revolting.

    Lots more.

    Questions?

  • Smokes
    10:29 pm on March 4th, 2014 5

    Sounds like it could be a repeat of the whole Ethanol thing.

    Questions hmmm…

    1. Seen any predictive studies on what impact to the power grid this will cause?
    2. How much will government plan on subsidizing and why should they?
    3. How does this all fit into the non-competitive utility market?
    4. How much more regulation will all of this result in?
    5. As 2/3 of world’s electrical power comes from fossil fuels this is really just a measure to stall the exhaustion of the power supply so will the immense cost and time justify the reward?

    By the way using “the people” as a measuring stick for anything other than a study on stupid isn’t a good idea. I point to the Bottled Water Industry which except for 2 years has grown about 5% each year.

  • Leon LaPorte
    2:48 am on March 5th, 2014 6

    “Electric cars will catch ON FIRE on when they become affordable and have comparable range to cars that use gasoline.”

    Ok, joking.

    But there still seems to be a severe penalty regarding the amount of time it takes to charge a vehicle. And then there’s all those pesky waste batteries and associated pollutants. And just what fuels do we use to generate electricity?

  • ChickenHead
    3:14 am on March 5th, 2014 7

    No time for a thoughtful comment… here are quick answers.

    1. Seen any predictive studies on what impact to the power grid this will cause?

    Grid is not ready, won’t be ready, and can’t be made ready even if everyone magically had an electric car tomorrow but didn’t change their driving habits.

    2. How much will government plan on subsidizing and why should they?

    No idea about their plan. They should because this transformation in technology has many long-term benefits in the national interest… from environmental to energy independence. Guiding these kinds of programs that are good for the nation yet are difficult to make happen on their own is a purpose of government.

    3. How does this all fit into the non-competitive utility market?

    Individual solar can’t power current expectations of car performance. For some people, wind might come close. Oil companies will go into the electricity business. All the same crap will happen that happens with gas prices. There will be no savings on transportation costs. Electric bill will go up… unless there are two price structures (such as with diesel and heating oil) or a per-mile tax.

    4. How much more regulation will all of this result in?

    Will industry make a rotected profit while inhibiting cheaper competition and will government get an easy-to-collect tax? Regulation will happen at least to that point.

    5. As 2/3 of world’s electrical power comes from fossil fuels this is really just a measure to stall the exhaustion of the power supply so will the immense cost and time justify the reward?

    Electric cars are more efficient… from regenerative breaking to less energy wasted as heat. Large scale electricity production is also more efficient… and can be made more-so. Unlike DIY gas, Individual renuable micro generation of electricity is possible which cuts down on the total electricity needed in the big picture.

  • ChickenHead
    3:25 am on March 5th, 2014 8

    Leon,

    - But there still seems to be a severe penalty regarding the amount of time it takes to charge a vehicle.

    Getting shorter… and maybe VERY short one ultracapacitors replace batteries.

    - And then there’s all those pesky waste batteries and associated pollutants.

    That can be managed. This will work itself out… to a tolerable extent… just as petrolium/electronics/chemical industries have done already.

    - And just what fuels do we use to generate electricity

    Anything. More usable power can be made from the same amount of gas generating electricity than powering individual cars. Distributing that electricity can be done cheaper than distributing gas from gas stations. Etc.

    Add in industrial-scale wind, solar, hydro, wave, nuke, individual contribution, etc.

  • Leon LaPorte
    3:34 am on March 5th, 2014 9

    Add in industrial-scale wind, solar, hydro, wave, nuke, individual contribution, etc.

    Not in the US. Drill baby drill. :roll:

  • Glans
    5:48 am on March 5th, 2014 10

    Fuse, baby, fuse!

  • Mike
    4:30 am on March 30th, 2014 11

    This is a great news I hope this car solve the battery problem with electric cars.

 

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